adventuresofcesium:

mainstream tumblr feminism may have many glaring faults but it has bred an army of teenage girls who understand the common ways that misogyny is reinforced in society and who know that they’re better off loving their fellow woman than fighting with her and that’s actually pretty damn revolutionary

(via umm-marina)

drtanner:

suicunesrider:

uneditededit:

Remember in 1993 when Jurassic Park was like…the end all, be all of special effects?

image

not gonna lie that still looks intimately real

I’m still somewhat convinced that someone sold their soul to create the special effects in Jurassic Park because that shit is over 20 years old and it still really, really holds up, better than the stuff in a lot of current movies, even.

Fucking witchcraft, man. 

(via thewinninglight)

leftieskerthings:

The best Jon Stewart quotes 

(Source: thedemsocialist, via thewinninglight)

"Absence of emotions neither causes nor promotes rationality. […] In order to respond reasonably one must first of all be ‘moved,’ and the opposite of emotional is not ‘rational,’ whatever that may mean…"

— Arendt, ‘On Violence’, in Crises of the Republic, pg. 161 (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

(Source: feelingpolitical, via muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow)

"To ask someone to publicly defend their humanity through ‘dialogue,’ and then chastise them for refusing to do so, completely ignores and obscures the additional burden of oppressed people participating in ‘dialogues’ that evaluate their own humanity."

Five big problems of compassion-baiting (via shitrichcollegekidssay)

(Source: ninjabikeslut, via muchanimal-veryfeminism-wow)

Evening Post: August 12, 1899.

(Source: scienceofsarcasm, via kassapti)

evilfeminist:

The only thing that women have to do to be called a “man hater” is name male violence. That is it, any analysis they might have is brushed aside for being too “angry” or too narrowly focused. 
But when was the last time you heard a man called “woman hater”? Even when men are abusive, or rapists, or johns, or even when they kill women, they are not given that label. His actions are typically explained away, or at worse shoved to the fault of his victim. 

(via laura-thesedays)

agoodcartoon:

Women have an unfair advantage in business because they can get to the top in much fewer steps. An MRA cartoon. - credit to Poopy Palpy

agoodcartoon:

Women have an unfair advantage in business because they can get to the top in much fewer steps. An MRA cartoon.
- credit to Poopy Palpy

(via feisty-feminists)

seanmonster:

tomato-greens:

slicknyc:

maryrobinette:

theargylegargoyle:

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s smash album, "Smooth Cosmos"
Track 1- Your Heavenly Body (My Telescope)

Track 2 — Carbon Dating 

Track 3 - It Was Written in the Stars

Track 4 - Red Shift (Of Your Hips)

Track 5 - Our Affection (It’s Natural Selection)

seanmonster:

tomato-greens:

slicknyc:

maryrobinette:

theargylegargoyle:

poodlepants:

I was all set to be snarky about this, but I think Neil did well enough on his own.

Neil deGrasse Tyson’s smash album, "Smooth Cosmos"

Track 1- Your Heavenly Body (My Telescope)

Track 2 — Carbon Dating 

Track 3 - It Was Written in the Stars

Track 4 - Red Shift (Of Your Hips)

Track 5 - Our Affection (It’s Natural Selection)

(via drst)

"

A thought experiment: Imagine how people might react if Taylor Swift released an album made up entirely of songs about wishing she could get back together with one of her exes.

We’d hear things like: “She can’t let go. She’s clingy. She’s irrational. She’s crazy.” Men would have a field day comparing her to their own “crazy” exes.

Yet when Robin Thicke released “Paula” – a plea for reconciliation with his ex-wife Paula Patton disguised as an LP — he was called incoherent, obsessed, heartfelt and, in particular, creepy.

But you didn’t hear men calling him “crazy” — even though he used it as the title of one of tracks.

No, “crazy” is typically held in reserve for women’s behavior. Men might be obsessed, driven, confused or upset. But we don’t get called “crazy” — at least not the way men reflexively label women as such.

“Crazy” is one of the five deadly words guys use to shame women into compliance. The others: Fat. Ugly. Slutty. Bitchy. They sum up the supposedly worst things a woman can be.

WHAT WE REALLY MEAN BY “CRAZY” IS: “SHE WAS UPSET, AND I DIDN’T WANT HER TO BE.”

“Crazy” is such a convenient word for men, perpetuating our sense of superiority. Men are logical; women are emotional. Emotion is the antithesis of logic. When women are too emotional, we say they are being irrational. Crazy. Wrong.

Women hear it all the time from men. “You’re overreacting,” we tell them. “Don’t worry about it so much, you’re over-thinking it.” “Don’t be so sensitive.” “Don’t be crazy.” It’s a form of gaslighting — telling women that their feelings are just wrong, that they don’t have the right to feel the way that they do. Minimizing somebody else’s feelings is a way of controlling them. If they no longer trust their own feelings and instincts, they come to rely on someone else to tell them how they’re supposed to feel.

Small wonder that abusers love to use this c-word. It’s a way of delegitimizing a woman’s authority over her own life.

Most men (#notallmen, #irony) aren’t abusers, but far too many of us reflexively call women crazy without thinking about it. We talk about how “crazy girl sex” is the best sex while we also warn men “don’t stick it in the crazy.” How I Met Your Mother warned us to watch out for “the crazy eyes” and how to process women on the “Crazy/Hot” scale. When we talk about why we broke up with our exes, we say, “She got crazy,” and our guy friends nod sagely, as if that explains everything.


Except what we’re really saying is: “She was upset, and I didn’t want her to be.”

Many men are socialized to be disconnected from our emotions — the only manly feelings we’re supposed to show are stoic silence or anger. We’re taught that to be emotional is to be feminine. As a result, we barely have a handle on our own emotions — meaning that we’re especially ill-equipped at dealing with someone else’s.

That’s where “crazy” comes in. It’s the all-purpose argument ender. Your girlfriend is upset that you didn’t call when you were going to be late? She’s being irrational. She wants you to spend time with her instead of out with the guys again? She’s being clingy. Your wife doesn’t like the long hours you’re spending with your attractive co-worker? She’s being oversensitive.

As soon as the “crazy” card is in play, women are put on the defensive. It derails the discussion from what she’s saying to how she’s saying it. We insist that someone can’t be emotional and rational at the same time, so she has to prove that she’s not being irrational. Anything she says to the contrary can just be used as evidence against her.

More often than not, I suspect, most men don’t realize what we’re saying when we call a woman crazy. Not only does it stigmatize people who have legitimate mental health issues, but it tells women that they don’t understand their own emotions, that their very real concerns and issues are secondary to men’s comfort. And it absolves men from having to take responsibility for how we make others feel.

In the professional world, we’ve had debates over labels like “bossy” and “brusque,” so often used to describe women, not men. In our interpersonal relationships and conversations, “crazy” is the adjective that needs to go.

"

— Men really need to stop calling women crazy - Harris O’Malley   (via punkrockmermaid)

(Source: hello-lilianab, via faeriviera)

micdotcom:

Woman live tweets IBM execs discussing why they don’t hire women, tries not to throw up

Toronto-based editor Lyndsay Kirkham has started a firestorm this week after overhearing what was apparently an incredibly sexist conversation between IBM executives at lunch — and live-tweeting it.

Unaware that they were transmitting sexist nonsense to cyberspace, the IBM executives openly discussed “why they don’t hire women.” If you take Kirkham’s account at its word, it actually gets way worse.

But wait, there’s more Follow micdotcom

(via thefeministpress)

"Compliment yourself when you look in the mirror, massage yourself, eat food that makes your body happy, talk nothing but positive about yourself, treat yourself as if you’re the most important thing in your life. Because you are."

— (via junipersighs)

(Source: travel-as-a-happy-hippie, via treehugger-me)

maliataete:

queerbriel:

welcome to womens clothing where the sizes are made up and the measurements don’t matter

(via feminismandtea)

First of all, I wanted to thank you. Before I started watching the show, I was really in the closet and I was totally ashamed of who I was. I hated myself. I started watching the show and seeing Cosima and seeing that everything is not about her sexuality and that she is more than her sexuality. My parents weren’t okay with me being gay. I started watching the show with my mum and its helped us start to rebuild our relationship because she sees Cosima and she sees that it’s okay and that people are more than their sexuality. I wanted to thank you for that. And my question is, what’s it like to have that effect on peoples lives? And to know that you are saving people’ lives like you did for me?

(Source: calliopesloan)

Tags: orphan black